Author Topic: Pavel Jerdanowitch  (Read 16492 times)

Mikhail Simkin

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Pavel Jerdanowitch
« on: May 05, 2006, 04:09:30 PM »
Ever since the begining I felt that the bad painting contest ought to be named after someone. However, I could not find anyone sufficiently exciting.  But "he who seeks finds", and, finally, I found. This is Pavel Jerdanowitch, The Founder and Supreme Master of The Disumbrationist School of Art.

I hope that  his paintings and his life story will be an inspiration for the participants of this contest.

Nanny

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Pavel Jerdanowitch
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2006, 06:20:26 AM »
That was interesting, thanks for bringing him to my attention.  I'd like to know more, if there is more to know.

Frankly though, I like his work!  LOL  He may have thought he was faking art, but how do you "fake" art?

Janet

Mikhail Simkin

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Pavel Jerdanowitch
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2007, 05:50:15 PM »
Quote from: "Nanny"
I'd like to know more, if there is more to know.

Little is known about Pavel Jerdanowitch. However, one thing, which is established with certainty is that he studied at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Today I received an entry for the 2008 contest from an artist, who attended the same school.

Joel

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Re: Pavel Jerdanowitch
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2008, 02:05:13 AM »
Yeah, I liked "Jerdanowitch's" art too, and I only saw it after reading the disclaimer.

Mikhail, if your point is to discredit modern art, why the Mozart and "famous" vs. "not famous" tests? Do you have personal opinions on the subject of what art, music, literature etc. is valuable, or great, or "true"? Also, how can an Internet quiz be "scientific" (this is an honest question, I've never really studied statistics). It would seem to me that there would be a number of problems here. Couldn't someone take the test multiple times? Do you allow for errors (for example, I clicked "Faulkner" on one test when I meant to click the other answer. Actually I think I did this on another test too)? And though you check out the IP addresses originating from universities, what does this really tell you? There are plenty of people at universities who haven't studied art, literature, and/or music any more than your average "man on the street." Couldn't someone take the test multiple times from different IP addresses, and couldn't multiple people take the test from the same address? There was one test where I skipped a bunch of answers to get to the forum (this was before I realized I could access it from the main page). Basically, it doesn't seem like you have any real knowledge of your pool of respondents, and because they came to you versus vice-versa they are not especially representative.

Mikhail Simkin

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Re: Pavel Jerdanowitch
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2008, 02:27:28 AM »
Also, how can an Internet quiz be "scientific" (this is an honest question, I've never really studied statistics). It would seem to me that there would be a number of problems here. Couldn't someone take the test multiple times? .... Couldn't someone take the test multiple times from different IP addresses ... Basically, it doesn't seem like you have any real knowledge of your pool of respondents, and because they came to you versus vice-versa they are not especially representative.
Apparently you concerns stem from confusing internet quiz with internet political opinion poll. Do you suggest that my quizzes could have been spammed by Ron Paul supporters?

Joel

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Re: Pavel Jerdanowitch
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2008, 10:42:10 AM »
I don't think even your site is immune from the endless hordes of Paulbots.

But seriously, I think I layed out my objections in the previous post. Those, plus the criteria and methods by which you choose the examples. By its very nature (a poll where you don't choose your respondents, but your respondents choose you) how can the test pool be representative? I suspect a more revealing (though not necessarily contradictory) response would be solicited by selecting a test group of "non"-aesthetes and people who are supposedly experts in a given field, to have them take the test and then compare the results. That is, if your hypothesis is that the experts don't have better "taste" than the laymen.

Mikhail Simkin

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Re: Pavel Jerdanowitch
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2008, 05:19:00 PM »
But seriously, I think I layed out my objections in the previous post. Those, plus the criteria and methods by which you choose the examples. By its very nature (a poll where you don't choose your respondents, but your respondents choose you) how can the test pool be representative?

Your objections are not the result of your independent thinking about the validity of this particular test but are a projection of criticism of internet opinion polls you heard somewhere. They resemble a fable about one ancient medical student. He went with his teacher to visit a sick man. And around his bed there were piles of orange peels. So the teacher advised the sick man to eat less oranges.  The student thought that he learned the secret of the trade and went to another sick man alone. He saw a bear hide under his bed. He advised the sick man to eat less bears.

Internet opinion polls are invalid for the following reason. Ron Paul supporters post on their sites links to every internet opinion poll. Supporters of other candidates don't do that. Thus the internet  polls are skewed in favor of Ron Paul.

Why would it be relevant to my quizzes? What group wants to change their results?

Joel

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Re: Pavel Jerdanowitch
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2008, 06:23:36 PM »
My main point is that the group of people who have visited your site and taken these tests may or may not be indicative of the public at large, may or may not be indicative of intellectuals or artists (seeing that they are somehow affiliated with universities hardly proves this one way or the other) and thus to draw general conclusions from your data is mistaken.

And I'm still curious about the answers to these questions:

Mikhail, if your point is to discredit modern art, why the Mozart and "famous" vs. "not famous" tests? Do you have personal opinions on the subject of what art, music, literature etc. is valuable, or great, or "true"?

Mikhail Simkin

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Re: Pavel Jerdanowitch
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2008, 12:30:52 AM »
Pavel Jerdanowitch returned home. I think that this article that I wrote ( http://www.artvernisaj.ru/2008/n9/obzor.html ) is the first one about him published in a Russian newspaper.